Pulisic on "development"

Discussion in 'WNT/MNT/World Cup/Int'l Soccer' started by Mystery Train, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. Mystery Train

    Mystery Train Silver

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  2. El Clasico

    El Clasico Bronze

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    Have stated this very concept over an over, mostly to ridicule by others on this board. Again, I say, if you have a player at U15 that has real potential, until the US gets it's act together, do your homework and see what your options are as your best option might just be to stay the hell away from DA. This goes for the girls side as well now that DA has decided to take an interest in the women.
     
  3. Gimpyhip

    Gimpyhip Bronze

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    I would say the DA is better than most of what we had before but still isn't where we need to be. His point about competing is on point. Not winning games or tournaments but winning every battle to keep your position and keep developing. The whole article they excerpted is here.

    https://www.theplayerstribune.com/christian-pulisic-usmnt-world-cup/
     
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  4. younothat

    younothat Silver

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    From 1,834 Days by CHRISTIAN PULISIC

    "It really frustrates me when people say, “Oh, he’s barely American,” or, “He grew up in the Dortmund academy,” or anything like that. First of all, it’s not true: Until I was 16, I came up through the U.S. youth system. I did all of the camps, the academies, the residency programs, the travel teams, and everything else it had to offer. I’ll always be a part of that system, and I’ll always be indebted to it. Second of all, I think that’s just a dangerous attitude in general: Having a closed-minded view of what does or doesn’t constitute being an American. And I hope it’s an attitude that we can keep out of this conversation in the years to come."

    When people ask me what has been the biggest game-changer of my career — when they ask me, you know, “What’s the one thing that has had the biggest impact on your game so far” — that isn’t the easiest question to answer. I’ve had a lot of good fortune over the years: from supportive parents, to amazing youth academies, to incredible teammates, and on down the line.

    But one thing that I’m not sure people realize, when they talk about my game, is just how lucky I’ve been to have a Croatian passport — and just how much of a difference it’s made for me.

    As a result of my dual citizenship, I’ve been able to play in Europe, training at the Dortmund academy, since I was 16. Without it? I would have had to wait until I was 18. And for a soccer player … man, ask anyone and they’ll tell you — those age 16–18 years are everything. From a developmental perspective, it’s almost like this sweet spot: It’s the age where a player’s growth and skill sort of intersect, in just the right way — and where, with the right direction, a player can make their biggest leap in development by far"

    Not easy getting a EC passport, unless you have relative in one of the countries, family own's a business at one, or and can afford to "buy" one.
    http://www.businessinsider.com/buy-citizenship-to-these-countries-2017-3

    The US has to find a better way to develop players years 16-18 because according to CP the U.S. youth system is not good enough and going to Europe at 16 is not within the grasp of most 16yr olds or their families
     
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