Goalkeepers and Distribution

Discussion in 'GOALKEEPER Forum' started by Grace T., Aug 9, 2018.

  1. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    So Tackett has another thought provoking article in his newsletter. He does a really great job IMHO of raising these issue. Basically, his point is that SoCal goalkeepers don't do a very great job at distribution, and that can result in a loss of games. He bemoans that too often coaches put "weak links" in the goalkeeper spot and too often cost goals because while they can learn to block they can't be great soccer players. I sort of agree and disagree and am interested in people's thoughts.

    First, distribution is a weak spot not only in Socal but we've seen it with all the recent goalkeeper blunders also on the pro side at the highest levels. If you look at where the errors were made, they were mostly made on the backpasses or initial distributions. So, it's a problem not only in SoCal, but I do agree it's a problem. Distribution is becoming more important in the modern game.

    But I disagree with him that it's entirely a problem in technique. In fact the big lumbering boy played in goal in the early years isn't necessarily placed there because he's a great shot stopper...by U11 the boys all kick into goal in the air fairly regularly and our budding nonathletic hulk isn't going to be able to extension dive...he's there because he can goalkick, punt or throw it far without being really taught much about technique based on sheer physical force. Coaches are inherently recognizing this, which is why those boys are being placed in goal. Where the fail takes place is that it's hard to get coaches (and really only the head coaches can do this, many of whom don't understand goalkeeping) to teach distribution in conjunction with the defenders during team practices. Tackett and Feuer do a little of this in their camps, but without knowing what the coach wants it's awfully hard to transmit tactics to the keeper. The goalkeeper coaches can teach the goalkeeper what the proper way to do things is, but if the defenders aren't on board, it's only going to be partially effective. There's a real hole in the curriculum (I mentioned before my E license exam didn't contain a single goalkeeper exercise) and that can only be fixed on the CalSouth training level and by instituting a continuing education requirement for coaches. Otherwise you are going to continue to get these big legged boys who eventually get to high school, and then suddenly drop out leading to our goalkeeper shortages at these ages. The U.S. used to be very good at developing goalkeepers by throwing kids who otherwise handled the ball in other sports into the role-- but it's becoming so specialized now I'm not sure that's going to be an effective strategy for much longer, particularly given how fast the modern ball moves now.

    Here's the link to the post:

    https://www.facebook.com/SoCalSchoolOfGoalkeeping/
     
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  2. jdiaz

    jdiaz Bronze

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    Distribution of the ball begin in the team training sessions. Which at all practices with your team doesn't happen. Coaches don't train to distribute the ball. Most coaches want the keeper to punt the ball as far as you can. And the other job is to save balls.
     
  3. jdiaz

    jdiaz Bronze

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    To be a keeper isn't in everyone to be. It's a position that have to understand.
     
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  4. GTS

    GTS Bronze

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    For the girls side I've seen a few keepers with good distribution skills, however that is also not enough for a keeper make a difference during a game.

    There is only one female keeper that i have seen that has all the qualities of what they consider "Keeper / Sweeper", she is currently representing USA in the CONCACAF U15 Championship in Fl.

    Credits for developing her skills are a combination of her last season team coach and goalie coach. She is still with the same club but will be playing up with 02 DA team.
     
  5. RedDevilDad

    RedDevilDad Bronze

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    I think distribution is a club style-of-play issue. The club my son plays for insists on goalkeepers playing out of the back... to that point that it stresses us parents out sometimes. My GK son maybe punted less than 5% of all of his distributions. Even if the other team pressed and knew it was coming, we still played goal kicks from the GK to the CB in the same-side corner or to the 6 checking back. Maybe, there was an occasional ball to a midfielder but the vast majority was playing it to one of those two. My son also threw the ball numerous times a game and the defenders played it back constantly. We work on it in practice as a team as well.
     
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  6. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    With respect to playing out the back, I think there's a hierarchy. At the most extreme end, there are the coaches that just tell their keepers to punt or GK long without training them (or the defenders) in the proper techniques or tactics (thereby resulting in turnovers). Then there are the coaches that play it long but give some thought to training the defensive line in receiving it and the keeper on where to distribute it. Then there are the coaches that religiously play it short but don't involve the keeper in the backpass or movement of the back line (such as by having the keeper check in to support). Then there are the coaches who religiously play short, combining with the back pass, but don't instruct or encourage the keeper on when to appropriately send it long, thereby giving them only a partial education. Then there are the coaches that understand that sometimes you want it to go long/sometimes you want it to go short, and while that balance may vary from coach to coach, they make sure the goalkeeper and the defensive lines understand when and how to execute. No data to back it up, but my hunch is taking all age groups and levels into account it's also a pyramid, with most coaches on the extreme end, and few at the top of the pyramid. As I've written before, I think this is in part because American coaches and players are so offensively minded...wish someone would do a survey with how much time coaches spend on offensive v. defensive skills, particularly at the younger ages [any bright young college students out there looking for a thesis topic in sports education?]...it's a problem in the entire world of soccer, but my guess is more so in the US than other places.
     
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  7. GTS

    GTS Bronze

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    Well stated.

    One of the key aspects as stated is *tactics" when a properly coached keeper is playing he / she will understand and use the defending line to get that turnover. The synergy to communicate and command the back line is a skill that is very effective. This is one of the other weak areas lacking IMO even with the most athletically skilled keeper.
     
  8. MyDaughtersAKeeper

    MyDaughtersAKeeper

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    An ideal situation is where the keeper/team can play out of the back, punt/kick it forward with intent and enough precision to the ball where it needs to go, and or throw it forward when open and possible. If you only have 1 option available, you give the other team an advantage. You have the ball, don't give up possession; at least that's what I am hearing from kids coach(es).
     
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  9. MWN

    MWN Silver Elite

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    Our experience has been that on Flight 3/2 teams the defenders are weak and playing out of the back will result in some horrible turn overs in the defending third, better to either send it deep or even better, throw it or kick it over the pressure to an open mid-fielder. At the Flight 1 and older teams, the players now have all the skills, which makes playing out of the back preferred. Advanced tactics are now better grasped and situational play is more common. Down by 1 with 10 minutes left, GK is looking for an assist and pressing it up while team takes more chances in attacking 1/3. Up by 2 and trying to kill 10 minutes, keep possession at all costs, switch field, go negative, etc.
     
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  10. RedDevilDad

    RedDevilDad Bronze

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    All distribution lessons and tactics go out the window when the 2nd goalkeeper gets subbed in as a forward. Then the game becomes can one goalkeeper can an assist to the other... Lol.
     
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  11. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    Agree that is typical, but I'm wondering if the reason is because the coaching on the lower flights is weak v. the defenders are weak. In other words, if you build it they will come v. you can't teach the kid to run before he can walk. I've seen at least one opposite viewpoint that even lower level teams can build out the back and should be taught regardless of danger:

    https://www.soccerparenting.com/playing-out-of-the-back/
     
  12. Dargle

    Dargle Bronze

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    One big issue for GKs in playing with their feet and receiving/distributing backpasses is that too many GKs are one-footed. That is true for field players too, but they can often mask it better or be hidden on a side etc. Many times, GKs who immediately kick the ball out of bounds, play with the ball in their box, or get overrun by a striker on a hot back pass, are doing these things because they are uncomfortable with the ball on their off foot and are either trying to get it off that foot quickly or trying to move it to the strong foot even if it means taking an extra touch, contorting their body so they aren't properly shielding the ball, or attempting an ill-advised pass to an already covered player who happens to be in line with their stronger foot.

    GK decision-making (another problem in distribution) can often improve with age and experience, but being able to play competently with both feet is something that really needs to start very early on in a GKs development.
     
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  13. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    Agree. Though I think there's a reason for this being a problem particularly with the goalkeepers. It's because the long GKs and punts will be done almost entirely with their dominant foot. At the younger ages, most GK are told to even do the shorter GKs with the dominant foot to make sure they get it out of the box. That's how many additional touches for the dominant foot v. the weaker one? For field players, there are times when they will be called to shoot upon with their weaker foot, so that is usually included in the training.

    p.s. don't even get me started on the times that goalkeepers were told to roll with their hands the goalkicks instead of kick them with the buildout lines.
     
  14. Dargle

    Dargle Bronze

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    GKs have to make up for those additional game/practice touches by working on their own against a wall or rebounder. It's why good GK coaches incorporate backpasses into almost every rep that get them kicking to both sides, switching from one side to the other etc before they have any shots against them. Many start warmups with passing drills that force them to use both feet before they move onto warmups involving catching the ball.
     
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  15. socalkdg

    socalkdg Silver

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    For practice and games first 30 minutes is footwork for my daughter. This includes individual ball control, then rondo, plus some other passing drills. Next 30 is the hands. The difficult part is getting the other players to play back, to position themselves for goals kicks as well as get open for goal kicks instead of standing around. You need the coach on board, the players on board, and a keeper that understands and knows how to play with their feet. Helps to have parents that understand mistakes will be made and goals scored because of this style.
     
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  16. Grace T.

    Grace T. Silver

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    This is my huge pet peeve. I can't tell you the number of times (and as a sometimes ref I get to see quite a few age groups) the GK gets yelled at by the coach for this, particularly with supposedly "possession based" teams. If you don't want the GK to boot it, and the defenders are sitting around like statutes, it shouldn't surprise you when the GK short circuits suddenly with that "what do I do?" moment where no one is open.
     
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  17. MWN

    MWN Silver Elite

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    The players are weak at the lower flights. I remember watching my kids game a few years ago and muttering to myself ... "don't pass it to X, don't pass it to X, don't pass ... god(*%U# you little mother*%&$# you passed it to X, ... come out ... come out !!!! ... (whewwwww ... the attacker who just stole the ball from X kicked it wide).

    Drive back home with my 13 year old
    [me]: So ... son, why did you pass the ball to X?
    [him]: {glaring at me}
    [me]: {glaring back with a raised eyebrow}
    [him]: That is how we play. I know he sucks, but that is how we play, he can't get better if I don't pass it too him.
    [me]: Ok {thinking to myself: fu$%^, I'm one of those parents!!!!}
    [me]: Hey, kid, you want some ice cream?
    [him]: No, after that sh#%^ show I need a beer.
    [me]: Beer sounds good. I'll order an IPA you get a root.

    The players are not good, the good coaches don't care and encourage the kids to play the right way. The bad coaches go for the win at all costs.
     
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  18. espola

    espola Silver Elite

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    Today I saw the first video of my college roommate's 11-year-old grandson playing on a North Carolina "travel team". He got his first goal as a competitive player when the opposing keeper made a weak throw out to a defender. "Our" grandson intercepted the throw and it was 1-on-1 from that point with the keeper backing into the goal.
     
  19. PaytoplayinLancaster?

    PaytoplayinLancaster? Bronze

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    Keeper sessions go over shot stopping, technique, tactics of building a wall, communication with your defense rarely, and you might receive a few back passes to swing it and switch the field. Team training maybe goes over rondos and small sided games to play out of the back, and then the scrimmage at the end of practice. 2 keeper sessions and 3 team trainings leave little time in the week for a specialized “play out of the back” practice. I’m not sure why, but I get a feeling that both the team and keeper coach are thinking that the other should incorporate the training in their sessions. I’ve heard team coaches say they want a keeper with good feet when they really mean they want a keeper that make quick decisions and distribute accurately. The key for keepers is to find a coach who can unlock accuracy and quick decision making with the ball at their feet. Tim Howard played midfield for his high school team to help with this.
     
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  20. Keepers_Keeper

    Keepers_Keeper Bronze

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    In our experience, club GK coaching clinics are not really training, just drills so not effective for skilled GKs. This is mostly because the skill range (and age) of keepers is very broad. 1:1 private coaching for us has been a challenge. Good private coaches are usually either with a different (translation - very large well funded) club that gives priority time spots to their players, or a college coach, so we have to work around both their schedule and ours. When we actually can train with the GK coach, distribution, foot skills and technical skills are the things she works on. Shot stopping at this point isn't the focus, although drills that fine tune (muscle memory) technique always are helpful but that isn't the main focus. I also have a job and my DD doesn't drive yet, so just physically getting her places after school/between practices is very challenging.

    My DD's best training comes from Soccerplus NTC and ANTC camps in the summer. I wish there were more opportunities for that level of training in our area on a more regular basis. SP camps are where distribution, form and very technical footwork skills are best developed. We need a (affordable!) GK school in SD :)
     
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