Another US Soccer idea...

Discussion in 'SoCalScene' started by timbuck, Apr 5, 2018.

  1. timbuck

    timbuck

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  2. 46n2

    46n2 Bronze

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    this thread...
     

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  3. MWN

    MWN Silver

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    Ok, so let's say the DA takes over the existing DA teams from all the clubs on the men's and woman's side as it currently exists. The DA is now responsible for:
    1. Paying Admins (Academy Directors and Technical Directors across nation at each club) (about $13.2 M)
    2. Paying Coaches ($43.8M)
    3. Training Fields ($4.3M)
    4. Games and Referees ($2.4M)
    5. Travel (U15+) ($15.3M)
    6. Residential Education (MLS teams only) ($20.1M)
    This would conservatively add about $99.3M in expenses to the USSF budget assuming it took over the existing DA teams and players. Here is my DA-TakeOver spreadsheet and assumptions. There would likely be around $25M to $30M in takeover costs, but let's ignore those.

    It currently receives right around $4M in Youth membership fees according to its 2016 Audited Financials.

    The USSF's net assets as of year end 2017 are $148M (Form 990)

    Taking over the existing DA system would require the USSF add an additional $100M in revenue or basically double its existing revenue per year to support the DA program because it would be bankrupt by year 2, if not earlier.

    Since the USSF cannot add more dollars through existing broadcast rights until 2022, its stuck.

    Speaking of broadcast rights, the USSF receives about $30M per year as part of the joint MLS/USSF Sum deal, the MLS receives about $60M. Its likely a little undervalued, but its guaranteed and the USSF comes out a winner especially with the failure of the men's team to make the World Cup.

    To put this into perspective, the domestic broadcast rights that the Premiere league receives is $1.5 Billion per year v. $60 Million per year for the MLS. Heck, NBC pays nearly $167M per year to broadcast the Premiere league in the US market.
     
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  4. MWN

    MWN Silver

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    @timbuck, if you read the article, US Soccer paid "zilch" for the technology and STATSports is outfitting the DA players for free, with the hopes that the rest of the 4M registered soccer players across the US will say "whoaaaa I need that, here is my $100." Again, the USSF isn't paying a dime for this technology.
     
  5. timbuck

    timbuck

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    Ahhh- I didn’t read the post script. A+ for you in reading comprehension!!!!
     
  6. Mystery Train

    Mystery Train Silver

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    Interesting stuff. Given the sheer numbers involved, it would be great to see some combination of the three suggestions you listed earlier and a pilot program utilizing some of that unused funding in some of the larger cities that would be targeted at the younger age groups and keep player costs at a minimum to broaden the footprint of the game and depth of talent in the pipeline. A larger scale takeover as imagined above would have to wait on the revenue to line up. Bottom line, it seems most of the things I don't like about youth soccer and the top level players (or lack of) the US produces as a result of that system will remain in place for a long time to come.

    Back to the point of this thread, this kind of reinforces for me that bio-banding is a good solution for a problem that much better soccer countries than the US have the luxury of facing. Not that it can't be tried and found helpful, but US soccer issues are much deeper.
     
  7. Lambchop

    Lambchop Bronze

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    Read the entire article!
     
  8. MWN

    MWN Silver

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    If I was President of the USSF, here is what I would do:
    1. Implement and support Solidarity and Training Fee tracking and payments, which will create incentives for the DA clubs to identify and scholarship talent.
    2. Leave the DA "club" system alone because having solidarity and training fee payments gives it some new revenue sources. Let's see what effect that might have.
    3. Get all MLS DA clubs to become fully funded residential (eliminating pay-2-play at this level).
    4. Go after FIFA's article 19 to allow an exception by guaranteeing USSF support. Article 19 exists to prevent trafficking of minors and the negative consequences that exist when clubs terminate minor's agreements/training. Eliminate the negative consequence through national support/guarantees.
    5. Reform the National Team youth program as follows:
      A. Recognize that the US is 325M people, whereas England 66M. We can fit 5 Englands (population wise in the US). We create 5 Youth National Team Regions, each with a Residential Training Center and full roster of coaches and trainers (U15, U16, U17, U18/19). Regional DA programs feed into the Regional National Team "elite" training. Cost would be about $4M to $5M for each ($20M-25M).
      B. The youth in these programs (H.S. Age), would represent roughly the top 125 players in each age group (500 players).
      C. This program would eventually be funded through changes to Article 19 and Solidarity/Training fee payments to the extent the youth turn pro.
    This would create the following player path:
    1 National Team per age group for international competitions.
    5 Regional National Teams per age group for residential training (500), these kids would also become likely acquisition targets by European and Latin American professional academies.
    20 DA-1 Residential MLS teams for residential training (1,400 players)
    150 to 90ish (U12-U19) DA-2 Non-Residential teams for regional training (60,000 players)
    Competitive Leagues/Clubs (4,000,000 players)
    Recreational (20,000,000 players)
     
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  9. MWN

    MWN Silver

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    Just for the record, US Soccer only administers the A and B licenses. State Associations administer the C, D and E (now Grassroot), using US Soccer curriculum. On the licensing front in 2017, US Soccer reported:

    $4.662 M in expenses arising out of the Coaching Programs and Training.
    $2.857 M in revenue attributed to the programs
    Net Loss of $1.805 M for coaching programs and training.

    Cal South (who got most of your $550) typically averages about a net $70k loss with regard to the coaching education program (expenses v. revenue).

    Aside from the fact that only a small portion of your $550 went to US Soccer, are you arguing that you should pay more so neither Cal South nor US Soccer are taking loses on the coaching programs?
     
  10. Mystery Train

    Mystery Train Silver

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    Impressive. I like your thinking on the 5 regional YNT and the fully funded MLS DA's. Very smart way to broaden the exposure to more players, put more eyes on the pool and decrease the odds of a diamond slipping through the cracks. I'd vote for this. You shoulda thrown your hat into the ring when Sunil stepped down. Missed opportunity, bro. ;)
     
  11. timbuck

    timbuck

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    True. Cal South Adminiaters c and d license. From a small sample that I’ve looked at, CalSouth is considerably more expensive than many other states.
     
  12. MWN

    MWN Silver

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    I would have never made it because my platform is opposed by both the Players Council and the MLS/SUM, which represent a controlling interest of the votes.

    By the way, the real A-Holes in this whole solidarity/training fee issue are the players who vehemently oppose it, believing it will reduce potential compensation to them. They have threatened to go after youth soccer organizations if US Soccer begins to administer it.
     
  13. futboldad1

    futboldad1 Silver

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    Not that it much matters, but according to the US Soccer Coaching Education website you and MWN are both wrong on this... A, B and C are all US Soccer run. Cal South does just the D and grass roots (formerly e). Their website is very clear on this. Are the other "stats" posted more accurate as it was interesting reading but now I'm not so sure...
     
  14. futboldad1

    futboldad1 Silver

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    For the record you're likely more in the know than me...I'm a lowly E-holding parent from my AYSO coaching days and that license no longer exists ....I just looked at the website as I remember back when I took mine the E and D were the only ones offered...but I even balked at the D so there's that :)
     
  15. smellycleats

    smellycleats Bronze

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    This whole thing is weird.
     
  16. MWN

    MWN Silver

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    I can't believe somebody is questioning me. Its shocking and very distrurbing.

    [googling, googling, rechecking, googling, rechecking ... close browser]

    No. A & B are administered by US Soccer. C, D and E (now Grass Roots) are administered by Cal South (effective a few years ago).

    Evidence:

    1. US Soccer's 2017 990 - See page 2 of PDF (page 3, Section 4c), which states that US Soccer does A & B, States Associations do C-E, and F is online.
    2. US Soccer Digital Coaching Website - https://dcc.ussoccer.com/courses/available/16/details/1546 - If you look at the "C" course (Dec. 15-22) Stephen Hoffman (Cal South) is the Instructor. Looking at the B course, Jan 7, 2018, GIANNA MILARO of US Soccer is the instructor.
    Now, I do not doubt that you saw something on a website that is inconsistent with US Soccer's representations to the IRS and the current coaching courses that have Cal South personnel teaching/instructing the C-E/Grassroots courses.

    I would love to see a link.
     
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  17. futboldad1

    futboldad1 Silver

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    This is some most awesome researching, and it seems I am in over my head!

    Link is this one from the current us soccer site https://www.ussoccer.com/coaching-education/licenses/national-d

    Not an impressive link but includes this is the final paragraph "As demonstrated in the past, member organizations will be empowered to organize and host the in-person grassroots courses and the updated D course on behalf of U.S. Soccer." A-B-C omitted from this.

    From what I can gather the C did indeed used to be conducted by Calsouth when it was just a 9 day course but since it spread out over several months (from 2017 onwards according to their website) that has changed. This would maybe be supported by the IRS document link which pertains to 2016, but would undermined by your other link which does indicate it's regional....If it were important I'd have a headache!

    Im probably wrong...Id never heard of the dcc until you linked to it! Thank the lord my dad "coaching qualifications" finished at my "e"... I'd be too confused to go any further even if I could muster paying for it!
     
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  18. futboldad1

    futboldad1 Silver

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    On topic...I'm not for this latest ussf intervention of bio-banding.
     
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  19. Keepermom2

    Keepermom2

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    Why not beat a dead horse and continue off topic on a subject I can care less about I asked myself....

    Here is the link to the current 2018 C License training and in fact Steve Hoffman is the instructor this weekend. My daughter volunteered for it and she was informed she was getting a gift from Cal South for doing it.

    https://www.ussoccer.com/stories/20...cation-announces-2018-c-course-schedule-dates
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2018
  20. MWN

    MWN Silver

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    Hoffman aka Hoffy is the CalSouth DOC for ODP and generally the top dog Coach for CalSouth.

    I don't know his position on bio banding
     

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