5 homegrown cut by LAGALAXY

Discussion in 'Boys Development Academy' started by jpeter, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. ultimate20

    ultimate20 Bronze

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    Questions- What does the large amount of foreign players rostered and playing on virtually every MLS team do to the development of upcoming American players?
    What role does the relatively low salary structure for the majority of players have on the development of upcoming American players?
     
  2. espola

    espola Silver Elite

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    This is a weakness I have been discussing lately. A good number of our better youth players end up in college soccer programs. After they graduate, they may have college-graduate options. So the choice is take an opportunity to sign on to a low-level professional soccer team at a low salary with no promise of even lasting out the first year, or take a job with a tech startup for twice as much with a possibility of stock options and performance bonuses.
     
  3. Sunil Illuminati

    Sunil Illuminati Bronze

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    Fair enough....but my question would be, given the overall standard of the league, is this truly a platform for any player to blossom?
     
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  4. boomer

    boomer Bronze

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    I definitely hear ya. It would be ideal if players with high potential had the opportunity to go to academies and eventually first teams overseas early like Pulisic did, but the unfortunate reality is that for many talented teenagers, MLS is the only legal option before the age of 18. Even though the standard of MLS isn't great, it is certainly better than USL. If a player develops well enough in MLS at a young age (16-20yrs old), opportunities outside of the US will happen more frequently for those kids, or at least they could make a real go at a pro career here in the states if they don't quite meet that overseas standard. Take these 5 players again...none are going to have better leagues anywhere in the world lining up to give them a shot because their development was severely undermined during their formative years here in the states. Was there another Pulisic in that group? I seriously doubt it, but how many potential Pulisics have been overlooked and underdeveloped by the MLS machine where quality teenagers are pushed aside in favor of middle-grade veterans and marque names on jerseys? USL is supposed to be a short-term stepping stone for homegrown players, not a destination and eventual career graveyard.
     
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  5. JJP

    JJP Bronze

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    You have to earn your place on a team, so Galaxy has every right to cut them, but I think these kids that were cut by Galaxy were strung along too long. If these kids are not getting regular first team minutes by 20, they should be cut so they still have time to go to college on a soccer scholarship.
     
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  6. SBFDad

    SBFDad Bronze

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    Can’t play in college if cut from their pro contract at 20. No longer eligible having been a pro, but I get your main point. Play them or let them move on.
     
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  7. younothat

    younothat Silver

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    MLS has some interesting, convoluted, and ever changing rules and regulations regarding home grown players
    https://www.mlssoccer.com/league/official-rules/mls-roster-rules-and-regulations

    This is older guide by has the concept down: https://www.brotherlygame.com/2015/...-player-rule-major-league-soccer-visual-guide

    There is a new twist just recently:

    "Multiple league sources tell me MLS is set to approve a new rule this offseason that will allow teams to keep 100 percent of transfer fees for Homegrown Players. This incentivizes league owners to invest more in player development, and rewards the teams that do so successfully. Currently, MLS receives 25 percent of any Homegrown transfer"
    http://soccer.nbcsports.com/2017/11/08/report-mls-to-change-how-clubs-profit-from-transfers/

    "When stories come out that have Atlanta United turning down $30 million in transfer fees for two players, it’s clear that something is quite backwards. And the way Carlos Bocanegra and Darren Eales have been running ATL, that money could bring in some massive talent."
    https://www.dirtysouthsoccer.com/20...-major-impact-on-the-future-of-atlanta-united

    If you kid plays for a MLS club in the DA there are somethings you might want to consider, the club now has your homegrown rights so your options could be somewhat limited in MLS if you want to sign as homegrown to any other MLS club or what to come back to the MLS at some point.

    Paul Arriola's move to D.C. United a case study in MLS transfer rules
    http://www.espnfc.com/major-league-...-dc-united-a-case-study-in-mls-transfer-rules

    "What's also giving many pause is the $500,000 in allocation money DCU sent to the Galaxy. A player qualifies as a Homegrown Player if he's been with the club's academy for at least one year. Arriola spent a mere seven-and-a-half months with the Galaxy, and played in just 11 matches. But apparently there is another mechanism triggering Homegrown status. An MLS spokesperson confirmed that by virtue of LA offering Arriola a contract prior to his signing with Club Tijuana, the Galaxy obtained right of first refusal should he ever opt to try and sign a contract with an MLS club"

    Arriola acutally played academy with Arsenal for longer than the Galaxy but they scopped him up, retrained his rights, and make a cool 500K in the process even though all they did is offer him a contact which he did'nt sign.



     
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  8. JJP

    JJP Bronze

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    You’re absolutely right, forgot about that. It just goes to show u how f—ked up the NCAA system is. Colleges, coaches, administrators are making money hand over fist while kids take all the risk and provide free labor.
     
  9. full90

    full90 Bronze

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    A handful of schools are making money hand over fist. Not all of them. And not men's soccer coaches for sure. And while it's "free labor" the kid does get school paid for, gear paid for, medical services paid for, tutoring paid for, housing paid for, travel paid for, internships on campus, nutritionist paid for, strength and conditioning training paid for and, if applicable, marketing for any future athletic career done for free. So I am not sure how this qualifies as "free" labor. A lot gets invested in each student.
     
  10. xav10

    xav10 Silver

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    zero money in men's college soccer. including the coaches. it's just really bad all around, unless you really are a "student athlete" or want to play soccer for a couple of years at school, on your way to an MLS career.
     
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  11. jpeter

    jpeter Bronze

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    A good college education costs $$ so for a student's athletes all the things you listed + potential sholarships money are nice benefits.

    The Paul Arriola comparison as opposed to the JV home grown route is telling.

    Back them 30k or so was the starting wage for fresh home grown MLS players but still only about 55k today. Considering the hours their putting in this amounts to equivalent of a minimum wage job.

    Interesting about this:
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homegrown_Player_Rule_(Major_League_Soccer)

    "MLS roster rules allow a team to sign players to contracts similar to Generation adidascontracts,[2] which do not count against the MLS salary budget and may earn a much higher salary than the league minimum. MLS has since removed this wording from the roster rules.[3] That means homegrown players will not count against the salary budget only if they are registered using supplemental roster slots, but will still count against the salary budget if they are registered using senior roster slots. There is, however, supplementary salary budget made by MLS only for homegrown players that are registered using senior roster slots called homegrown player funds.[4]

    Zades is getting almost 600k as a homegrown off the books but most are geting a lot less, 55k for the rookies.

    http://www.topdrawersoccer.com/the9...a-mixed-bag-in-the-latest-league-salary-dump/

    Gamble on a homegrown or USL soccer contact for low pay and become ineligible for college soccer, potential benefits, and the other stuff? that goes with home grown or get a sure fire education? For Arriola who plays for MNT, makes good $ his choice is paying off, for the 5 cut maybe not so much yet.
     
  12. JJP

    JJP Bronze

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    Sure, the money is in college men's football and basketball. You're absolutely right.

    But I'd rather see that money given to students, not the administrators. I guess I'm tired of the so called "amateur idealism" BS in college sports. There may have been a noble intention a long time ago, but today it's clearly done to make sure the athletes, who are basically the talent and labor, don't get the money.

    There's no reason why the NCAA can't change its rules to make an exception for soccer players under, say, the cutoff age of 20, and treat them as amateurs if they get terminated or leave a pro contract.
     
  13. Wez

    Wez Silver Elite

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    Is it very rare for College players to get picked up by MLS, after they finish school?
     
  14. jdiaz

    jdiaz Bronze

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    I would rather have my kid get a college degree then play mls starting wage at 40, 000 a yr before taxes. There are few MLS clubs that move their home grown player to first team bases. Lets be realistic.
     
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  15. younothat

    younothat Silver

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    1.4% chance % NCAA to Major Pro*
    MLS SuperDraft 2017 (College Players)
    https://www.mlssoccer.com/superdraft/2017/tracker

    Out of of the ~25K or so NCAA players there are 80 or so spots every year in MLS some of which don't get filled
    http://www.ncaa.org/about/resources/research/mens-soccer

    Getting drafted is just the fist step, making the team and getting a decent wage is a whole another matter.

    Besides Jordan Morris (who left college early) don't recall many college players making much $ in the MLS.
     
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